ACADEMICS

  • Criminal Justice Courses

    CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
    A survey of the American Criminal Justice System as a socio-political institution. The police, criminal courts, and
    correctional and rehabilitative endeavors will be analyzed within the framework of empirical research from the
    perspectives of the social sciences. Required of all first-year students in the Criminal Justice major.
    Offered every year. 3 credits.
     
    CJ 102 Introduction to Corrections
    Prerequisite: CJ 101 or its equivalent.
    An in-depth examination of the American Correctional System. Traditional punitive measures will be analyzed in
    relation to current reintegration alternatives. (formerly CJ 202)
    Offered every year. 3 credits.
     
    CJ 111 Law Enforcement and Society
    Prerequisites: CJ 101 or its equivalent
    The structure and function of law enforcement agencies in contemporary society will be analyzed in their sociological
    context. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of the police within the framework of the Criminal Justice System.
    (formerly CJ 201)
    Offered every year. 3 credits.
     
    CJ 193 Special Topics in Criminal Justice for First-Year Students
    All "193" courses are approved for LASC but may vary by section. See current course listing for specific LASC area approval.
    Introductory level course covering topics of special interest to first-year students. Offered only as a First-Year Seminar.

    CJ 203 Theories of Crime

    Prerequisite: CJ 101
    An exploration of prominent theories of crime causation, ranging from biological, psychological, sociological, and
    cultural explanations. Theories are compared and contrasted and implications are discussed as foundations for
    criminal justice system policy. (formerly CJ 121)
    Offered Every Year. 3 credits.
     
    CJ 205 American Judicial System
    Prerequisite: CJ 101 or its equivalent.
    An examination of the development of law and the American legal system, including the problems related to the meaning
    and uses of law; the organizational hierarchy of the courts; and the role of the courts in the criminal justice system.
    Offered every year. 3 credits.
     
    CJ 215 Art Crimes
    LASC – Thought, Language, and Culture; Human Behavior and Social Processes
    This course explores a variety of criminal offenses involving the production, consumption, distribution, and display of
    art, including graffiti/street art, forgery, theft, vandalism, rights infringement, and indecent and politically subversive
    art. The course examines these offenses from an interdisciplinary perspective, including law, criminology, aesthetics,
    economics, and cultural studies. Art crimes are examined from the international level to the local one. (This course
    does not count as a Criminal Justice elective for Criminal Justice majors)
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 301 Juvenile Procedure
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    An examination of the underlying philosophy of juvenile justice and procedures used to process a juvenile alleged
    to be delinquent through the juvenile justice system. The course will focus on the differences between juvenile
    procedure and adult criminal procedure by examining recent court decisions and statutory law pertaining to juveniles.
    3 credits.
     

    CJ 302 Criminal Law
    Prerequisite: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    The function of criminal law and its relationship to various criminal offenses, including crimes against persons and
    crimes against property.
    3 credits.
     

    CJ 303 Patterns of Criminality
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    The U. S. Department of Justice Index Crimes will be studied along with other crimes; which will be selected on the
    basis of their contemporary administrative significance and their effect on the criminal justice system in particular.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 304 Prevention and Control
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    An in-depth examination of the criminal justice system and the efforts it has exerted in an attempt to prevent and
    control criminal behavior. Course will focus on the traditional methods including probation and parole as well as
    recent trends in crime control and prevention: the utilization of community based treatment programs and attempts
    by many criminal justice agencies to avoid the processing of individuals through the system.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 305 Principles of Evidence and Proof
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    The study of the different types of evidence, relevance, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, impeachment and crossexamination
    and privileged communications.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 306 Contemporary Problems in Corrections
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    An intensive analysis of selected problems in institutional and community corrections.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 307 Contemporary Problems in Law Enforcement
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    An intensive analysis of selected problems in American law enforcement and police-community relations. A major
    research paper is required.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 310 Organized and White Collar Crime
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    The methods through which organized crime influences and, in many instances, controls entire communities. Traditional
    types of crime heavily influenced by organized crime, such as loan sharking and gambling, will be analyzed in an
    effort to demonstrate the basis of power and wealth of organized crime in the United States.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 311 Victimology
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    Criminal-victim relationships, with emphasis on victim-precipitated crimes and compensation to the victims.
    Consideration is given to: concept and significance of victimology; time, space, sex, age, and occupational factors
    in criminal-victim relationships; victims of murder, rape, other violent crimes and property crimes; victim typology;
    the public as victim; restitution and compensation to victims.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 312 Women and the Law
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    An examination of the female and her involvement with the legal processes in the United States. Attention will
    be focused on the female as the offender and as the victim. Analysis of the various theoretical approaches to
    understanding the female offender will be presented in addition to an exploration of the recent literature on the
    female and the criminal justice system.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 314 Seminar on Offender Rehabilitation
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    The “nothing works” doctrine generated by the controversial Martinson Report has resulted in considerable confusion
    regarding the effectiveness of corrections programs designed to elicit specific behavioral changes on the part of
    the correctional client. This course will thoroughly examine the debate surrounding the “nothing works” doctrine and
    present those methods of rehabilitation that have proven effective in the treatment of offenders. Probation, parole
    and programs for the incarcerated offender will be the primary focus of this course.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 316 Civil Liabilities of Criminal Justice Professionals
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    The civil liability for harm inflicted on another. Topics to be considered will include: intentional torts such as
    assault, battery, and false imprisonment; negligence; torts of strict liability; libel, slander and defamation; liability of
    owners and occupiers of land; and the liability of state and federal employees for harm caused in their respective
    professional capacities.
    3 credits.

     
    CJ 317 Evolution of American Law Enforcement
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    A critical analysis of the contemporary American law enforcement establishment in relation to the evolutionary
    forces that have contributed to its development. Excepting modern technology, the law enforcement function tends
    to run in predictable cycles. Traditional in origin, these cyclical phenomena may be observed in the patters of older
    societies. Reflections of the past are deemed vital to a more objective and well-rounded perception of current issues.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 319 Economic Crime
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    The manner in which professionals in business are able to manipulate and control computer systems and engage
    in various types of while collar crime will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on consumer and computer fraud,
    embezzlement, and particular attention will be focused on corporate crime and on the criminal justice system's
    attempts to identify, prevent, and control it.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 320 Criminal Procedure: Fourth Amendment Rights of the Accused
    Prerequisites: CJ 205, or its equivalent; or permission of the instructor.
    A study of due process, the exclusionary rule, and the legal problems associated with arrests, searches, and seizures.
    3 credits.
     

    CJ 321 Criminal Procedure: Fifth and Sixth Amendment
    Prerequisite: CJ 205, or its equivalent; or permission of the instructor.
    A study of the legal problems associated with interrogations, confessions, entrapment, lineups and wiretapping and
    electronic surveillance.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 322 Gangs
    Prerequisite: Junior standing
    This course will offer an in-depth study of gangs in the United States. Topics to be examined include various theories
    of gang formation, group dynamics, and individual factors associated with gang membership. Attention will also be
    given to the different types of gangs that exist. Given these dynamics, the final portion of the course will focus on
    prevention and intervention efforts aimed at reducing gang behavior.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 323 Religion and Crime in Contemporary America
    This course will serve as an introduction to issues related to religion and the criminal justice system. Topics will
    include the religious origins of the legal and correctional systems, religion and contemporary law, religion in prison
    and corrections, hate crimes and terrorism.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 324 Restorative Community Justice
    Prerequisite: Junior standing
    Restorative Community Justice is based on a new vision of criminal justice that stresses offender reintegration through
    offender accountability. Rather than simply a legal violation, crime is viewed as a breach in the relationship between
    the offender and the victim, and also the offender and the community. To the greatest degree possible, resolution
    should rest in the hands of those most directly involved, with the state mediating the conflict. This course will explore
    the philosophy of restorative justice, and current practices of victim-offender mediation, where the offender is required
    to directly confront the person(s) harmed, and the victim is given a real voice. It will examine how offenses can be
    resolved in ways that are positive and constructive for victims, communities, and also for offenders. The student will
    develop an understanding of the basic tenets of restorative justice, and also knowledge of how this concept is being
    applied in criminal justice practices in the U.S. and internationally.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 325 Capital Punishment
    This course focuses on capital punishment law, particularly United States Supreme Court decisions addressing
    constitutional issues relevant to the death penalty. Students also will explore empirical, penological, political, and
    moral issues related to the death penalty and its administration.
    3 Credits.
     
    CJ 329 Crime and the Media
    The course will deal with issues related to the mass media and crime in society. The increasing importance of the
    mass media in shaping peoples perception of and attitudes toward the criminal justice system will be focused on.
    Other topics will include the media as a cause and cure for crime, biases in the media coverage, the effects of the
    media on criminal proceedings and crime on television and films.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 330 Criminal Justice Administration
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    An examination of organizational theory and its applications within criminal justice agencies. Consideration of the
    principles of organization and methods adopted by progressive agencies to insure effective criminal justice service
    to the community will be reviewed.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 331 Research Methods in Criminal Justice
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    An introduction to scientific methodology as related to criminal justice. The course will focus on the development
    of hypotheses, data collection, data analysis and hypothesis verification. Attention is also given to basic statistical
    techniques appropriate for criminal justice research.
    Offered every year. 3 credits.

    CJ 332 Homicide
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102, CJ 205, or their equivalent.
    An in-depth discussion of the legal definitions of and rationalizations for homicide. The statistical aggregates of
    those occasions will be considered in terms of demographic and ethno-cultural phenomena. The murder episode
    is examined within the context of morality.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 333 Terrorism
    Prerequisites: CJ 101, CJ 201/CJ 111, CJ 202/CJ 102.
    This course will explore the development of terrorism as a form of crime. Topics to be studied include major terrorist
    groups and their strategies, tactics and targets, jurisdictional issues, anti-and counter-terrorist operations, federal
    law enforcement, and future trends in terrorism.
    3 credits.
     

    CJ 334 Drugs, Crime and Society
    Prerequisites: CJ 101
    This course will present an overview of the problems of drug-related crime in contemporary society. Specific drug
    substances are discussed, as well as legal, cultural, and social factors in connection with drug enforcement, prevention
    and policy, and the effects on society.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 335 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
    Prerequisites: CJ205
    Increasingly, practitioners in the American criminal justice systems are required to interact with their counterparts, as
    well as citizens from other national jurisdictions. Effective interaction, including cooperation and sharing, requires some
    understanding of how criminal justice is conceived and practiced in other parts of the world. This course examines and
    compares key institutions of the criminal justice systems in six model countries, two in Europe, two in Asia, one Islamic
    nation, and one from Latin America. We look not only at formal organizations in each country, but also at actual practices
    and how they compare with each other and the United States. To understand how differences and similarities have
    developed, we also learn something of the history, culture, political system and economic conditions of each model country.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 337 Criminal Justice Ethics
    This course investigates the application of moral logic to problems in the field of Criminal Justice. Issues related to
    policing, criminal prosecution, and corrections will be studied. Students will be encouraged to induce general moral
    precepts and rules from the examination of particular situations and problems.
    3 Credits.
     
    CJ 338 Issues in Contemporary Security
    Prerequisite: Junior standing
    An overview of security systems applicable to contemporary industrial and commercial demands. Losses through physical,
    technological, and personnel hazards are viewed as preventable phenomena if vulnerabilities are recognized and ameliorative
    measures taken. Counter-measures will be weighed within the framework of loss criticality and cost of effectiveness.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 339 Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections

    This course will present an overview of correctional options in the community. It will challenge students to consider
    how sanctions for criminal offenders can be managed in the community without unduly sacrificing community safety
    or the integrity of the justice system. Community Corrections is a fluid and continually changing field. The focus will
    be on main themes and trends in probation and parole. Specific attention will be given to the dual an often conflicting
    goals of community protection and positive offender change with which the practitioner is typically confronted, the
    types of policies and programs implemented to meet these goals, and their effectiveness.
    3 credits.
     

    CJ 340 - 349 Special Topics in Criminal Justice
    An in-depth study of a limited or specialized area within the criminal justice field. Course content will vary according to
    the area of specialization of the instructor and the interest of the students. May be repeated if course content differs.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 352 Principles of Investigation
    Prerequisite: CJ 101 and CJ 201/CJ 111/CJ 111
    This course provides students with a theoretical framework for the practice of investigation in both the private and public
    sectors. Various techniques and protocols for investigation will be explored including infractions and ethics investigations
    and background investigations. Students will link these methods to the collection of physical evidence, interpretation and
    preservation of data, rules of evidence, techniques of documentation, along with interview and interrogation approaches.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 371 Strategic Planning

    Prerequisite: Junior standing
    This course is designed to acquaint students with general theories of planned change at the individual, organizational,
    and community levels. Special attention will be given to the need for employee involvement and collaboration in
    working toward organizational goals, with reference to concepts such as reinventing government and total quality
    management. The emphasis will be on applied theory. Students will be expected to develop their own ideas for
    change in the fields of policing, courts, or corrections. They would then be required to consider the resistances that
    would likely arise as their changes are introduced, and how they should best be dealt with, considering planned
    change theories from the course.
    3 credits.

     
    CJ 384 Adult Offenders: Case Studies
    Prerequisite: Junior standing.
    A critical, theoretical examination of certain types of adult offenders, especially those who are socially disadvantaged.
    This examination will be based largely upon the analysis of qualitative research studies that have been done with adult
    offenders. Special attention is given to the case study method and to understanding adult offenders as individuals
    making choices within the constraints of larger political, economic, social and ideological structures.
    3 credits.
     
    CJ 385 Juvenile Offenders: Case Studies
    Prerequisite: Junior standing.
    A critical, theoretical examination of various types of juvenile offenders. This examination will be based largely upon
    the analysis of qualitative research studies that have been done with juveniles. Special attention is given to the case
    study method and to understanding juvenile offenders as individuals embedded within and influenced by numerous
    social structures (e.g., gender, race, family, school and economics).
    3 credits.

    CJ 398 Field Practicum in Criminal Justice
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
    The field practicum class involves the student's participation in the day-to-day functions of a publicly funded criminal
    justice agency. The course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to translate the theoretically oriented
    classroom experience into practical application.
    3-6 credits.
     
    CJ 399 Independent Study

    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
    Individual research and independent study related to particular aspect of criminal justice that is of special interest.
    3-6 credits.
     
    CJ 400 Criminal Justice Capstone
    LASC - Major Capstone
    Provide students the opportunity to engage in a culminating experience in which they use critical thinking skills
    to analyze, integrate, and synthesize the knowledge gained in their major program of study. Students will apply
    that knowledge and critical thinking skills to the exploration of issues and concerns/problems of the profession in
    preparation of future employment and/or graduate education.
    3-6 credits. Prerequisite: Senior Standing
    Offered Every Year.
     
    CJ 408 Directed Study
    Directed study offers students, who because of unusual circumstances may be unable to register for a course when
    offered, the opportunity to complete an existing course with an established syllabus under the direction and with
    agreement from a faculty member.
  • CONTACT US

    Criminal Justice
    Learning Resource Center
    Suite LRC-120
    508-929-8417