ACADEMICS

Mim Plavin-Masterman

Assistant Professor

I have two research streams: First, I study the efforts of entrepreneurs to reclaim abandoned spaces in support of making cities more livable. More specifically, I examine the discourse practices entrepreneurs engage in that help them sustain their projects over the long time periods in which they occur (often 10 years or more). In doing so, my research contributes to a better understanding of how these projects come to be, what impacts they have on the cities they are in, and other later projects trying to emulate their success. Second, I study social class in college, and pedagogical implications of teaching across social class lines. This includes redesigning courses to improve student engagement and learning, along with efforts to use Open Educational Resources in Management courses, and the impact on student learning and retention.

Education

Cornell University
Industrial/Labor Relations
BS
Dartmouth College
Business Administration
MBA
Brown University
Sociology
Ph.D.
Skills Organizational Theory, Organizational Behavior, Strategic Management

Achievements

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Mini-Grant
2013-2014 AY Grant Award, travel to Annual AcademicOASIS Conference to present research
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Mini-Grant (jointly with Elizabeth Siler)
2014-2015 AY Grant Award,
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Open Educational Resources Initiative Grant (jointly with Elizabeth Siler),
2016-2017 AY Grant Recipient
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Publications

  • Papers
  • Articles
Papers
Changing the Conversation: How Institutional Entrepreneurs Use Discourse Themes to Reshape Urban Space Read More
Articles
Are Walls Just Walls? Organizational Culture Emergence in a Virtual Firm Read More

Courses

Organization Theory

Organization Theory


Structurally, the course focuses on four major metaphors in organizational theory: the organization as machine, the organization as organism, the organization as coalition, and the organization as ritual. Within each metaphor, we will examine three distinct levels of analysis: individual decision-making, organizational structure, and the inter- organizational environment. Throughout, students will be encouraged to seek contrasts and commonalities both across metaphors and across levels.
3 credits
Organizational Behavior

Organizational Behavior


USE THEORIES to analyze behavior and predict outcomes in organizational situations ANALYZE EFFECTIVENESS of your preferred behaviors as a team member
3 credits
Management and Organizations I

Management and Organizations I


This course explores perspectives on contemporary economic life that emphasize the role of politics, culture, history, and institutions. We will ask questions like, “Why do firms exist?”, “What is a market, really?”, and “Who decides where the state stops and the economy begins?” We will explore different ways that societies organize economic life, and what goes wrong (or right) as we come to rely more heavily on markets. The final portion of the course will examine the rise of inequality and how it connects to the changing nature of corporations, the rise of finance, and the changing labor market.
3 credits
Strategy

Strategy


DEVELOP AN ANALYTICAL TOOLKIT of concepts, frameworks and techniques you can use to identify, assess and develop strategies. LEARN TO ANALYZE unstructured problems and ambiguous situations encountered in the business world. PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES to further develop skills in problem solving, analytical thinking, and oral communication.
3 credits
Administrative Practices and Management – Organizations and Criminal Activity

Administrative Practices and Management – Organizations and Criminal Activity


USE THEORIES to understand illegal activities committed by basically criminal organizations. COMPARE that form of crime to what is committed by otherwise legitimate organizations such as corporations. EXPLORE both forms of the problem looking for common threads of causation and control.
3 credits