ACADEMICS

  • Philosophy

    The study of philosophy helps students to develop insights into the nature of individuals, societies, and values, and it helps them to think critically about themselves and the world around them. By studying philosophical works from the past and present, students engage theories about such central concepts as personhood, justice, gender, knowledge, and science.

    Requirements for a Minor in Philosophy: 18 credits, including:

    • PH 260 Philosophy of Science
      and at least one of:
    • PH 101 Ancient Western Philosophy
    • PH 102 History of Modern Western Philosophy, 1600-1800
    • PH 201 19th Century European Philosophy
    • PH 202 Selected Topic in 20th – 21st Century Philosophy

    Requirements for a Minor in Philosophy and Law: 18 credits, including:

    • PH 231 Philosophy of Law
    • PH 240 Political Theory

    A minimum of one course in logic:

    • PH 110 Critical Thinking
    • PH 115 Formal Logic I

    A minimum of one course in ethics:

    • PH 130 Ethics: Human Values and Conduct
    • PH 131 Medical Ethics
    • PH 132 Business Ethics
    • PH 133 Social and Political Ethics

    A minimum of one course in the history of philosophy:

    • PH 101 Ancient Western Philosophy
    • PH 102 History of Modern Western Philosophy, 1600-1800
    • PH 201 19th Century European Philosophy
    • PH 202 Selected Topic in 20th – 21st Century Philosophy

    Any elective philosophy course if sixth course is not from one of the lists above.
    Recommended:

    • PH 151 Race, Gender, and the Law
    • PH 215 Formal Logic II
    • PH 241 Genocide and Human Rights
    • PH 251 Mass Violence Against Women
    • PH 260 Philosophy of Science
    • PH 360 Philosophy of History

    Minors should contact the Chair of the Philosophy Department to arrange for departmental advising, and they should select their philosophy courses in consultation with their
    departmental advisor. Advising can include support for a student’s graduate, law, or other professional school application process.

  • Philosophy Department Student Learning Outcomes

    Regarding argumentation and evidence, students will:

    • Recognize, analyze, and assess arguments presented in readings, discussions, and other sources, such as newspaper editorials.
    • Construct arguments in which premises logically connect to conclusions.
    • Appreciate, evaluate, and employ scientific and social scientific evidentiary standards.
    • Identify or formulate alternative viewpoints, concepts, lines of argument, or interpretations of presented viewpoints, concepts, lines of argument, or interpretations, when those alternatives are not given.

    Regarding historical and theoretical frameworks, students will:

    • Develop knowledge of one major period in the history of philosophy.
    • Develop understanding, ability to discuss, and ability to evaluate major theories and concepts in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, and/or aesthetics.
    • Interpret philosophical texts in order to recognize, explicate, and critique a range of plausible meanings of each text.
    • Comprehend, represent, appraise, and sometimes resolve conceptual tensions among distinct metaphysical, etc., theories.

    Philosophy beyond the discipline, students will:

    • Develop critical questions about mainstream points of view and assumptions about the world, human beings, etc.
    • Appreciate and appraise the role and impact of philosophical analysis and inquiry in other disciplines, such as the physical sciences, medicine, religion, etc.
    • Examine and appraise claims about causal relations that are held to produce scientific knowledge or historical, social, cultural, and political developments.
    • Identify, comprehend, appraise, and/or apply multiple theories of ethical or social responsibility.