ACADEMICS

Anthony Dell'Aera

Anthony Dell'Aera

Assistant Professor of Political Science

Dr. Tony Dell'Aera is an Assistant Professor of Political Science, focusing on American Politics and Public Policy. He also serves as Faculty Fellow to the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the US Senate. His teaching and research interests include health care, environmental policy, American political development, city politics, political parties, elections, Congress, and the Presidency. His published works thus far examine the US health care system and the development of the prescription drug regulatory state. Dr. Dell'Aera has frequently served as a political analyst for various media outlets. Dr. Dell’Aera graduated from Trinity College and then Brown University, where he earned a Ph.D. in Political Science. Prior to arriving at Worcester State, he held Visiting Assistant Professorships at Union College and Trinity College. Dr. Dell'Aera served for over 12 years in state and local politics in Connecticut, and he is a strong proponent of civic education and community engagement both on and off campus. He encourages his students to get involved in public service, not only as a responsibility of citizenship but also as an educational experience which enriches the lessons that are learned inside the classroom. Dr. Dell'Aera also believes in the importance of free and open political discourse, and to that end he founded the Pizza and Politics discussion series of informal campus conversations, and has worked closely with the Binienda Center for Civic Engagement to organize several debates and election forums on campus.

Education

1998
Trinity College
Political Science and American Studies (Phi Beta Kappa)
BA
2000
Brown University
Political Science
MA
2008
Brown University
Political Science
Ph.D.
Skills American Politics, Public Policy, Elections, Campaigns, Political Parties, Congress, the Presidency, City Politics, State Government, Health Care, and the Environment.

Achievements

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Faculty Excellence Award
2011 - Trinity College Student Government Association
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Faculty Civic Engagement Award
2018 - Worcester State University Binienda Center for Civic Engagement
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Campus Compact Today's Vote Grant
2019
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Publications

  • Articles
Articles
"How a Pill Becomes the Law: Prescription Drug Regulation and Institutional Asymmetry in American Politics” in James Morone and Daniel Ehlke, eds. Health Politics and Policy (New York: Cengage, 2014). Read More
Articles
"Health Care Regulation and the Fragmentation of Federalism” in Brent S. Steel, ed. Science and Politics: Issues and Controversies (Washington DC: Congressional Quarterly Press, 2014). Read More

Service Projects

University Service

I currently serve on the All University Committee, the Capital Planning Committee, the Liberal Studies Advisory Board, and Civic Engagement Advisory Board. I have also served on the Student Affairs Committee and the Faculty Union Election Committee.

Research

Current and Past Research Activities

My current research studies generic prescription drug pricing and the regulatory state for vitamins and nutritional supplements in US health policy. I have presented peer-reviewed papers, chaired panels, and served as panel discussant at over 30 conferences including the annual meetings of the American Political Science Association, the Northeastern Political Science Association, the New England Political Science Association, the Southern Political Science Association, and the Southern Conference on African-American Studies.

Courses

PO 110

American Government


PO 150

Foundations of Legal Studies


PO 216

Political Parties and Interest Groups


PO 217

The US Congress


PO 243

City Politics


PO 250

Doing Political Science: An Introduction to Research Methodology


PO 264

American Political Thought


PO 311

Environmental Politics and Policy


PO 312

Health Politics and Policy


PO 318

Constitutional Law I: Federalism and Separation of Powers