ACADEMICS

Laura Wildemann Kane

Assistant Professor

Kane's research examines social phenomena such as families, states, and social media networks through a feminist lens. Her central research project is concerned with providing a conception of the family that substantially challenges how we view familial obligations in relation to more robust networks of care at the state-level. A second project focuses upon accountability relationships on the internet, especially those that result in ‘shaming’ and ‘doxxing’ culture. The common thread that ties these two trajectories together is the claim that an undervaluing of relationship in social, political, and digital contexts has precipitated current practices that misplace responsibility and the important goods that are associated with it. Kane received her Ph.D. in Philosophy, as well as a Certificate in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, from The Graduate Center of the City University of New York in 2017.

Education

2007
Hunter College, City University of New York
Philosophy
BA
2014
The Graduate Center, City University of New York
Philosophy
M.Phil
2017
The Graduate Center, City University of New York
Philosophy
Ph.D.

Publications

  • Articles
  • Other
Articles
“On Hegel, Women, and the Foundation of Ethical Life: Why Gender Doesn’t Belong in the Family.” in CLIO: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History, 44(1): 1-18. (2014). Read More
Articles
“Childhood, Growth, and Dependency in Liberal Political Philosophy.” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 31(1): 156-170. (2016). Read More
Articles
“Are Children Capable of Collective Intentionality?” in Childhood and Philosophy, 13(27): 291-302 (2017). Read More
Articles
“What is a Family? Considerations on Purpose, Biology, and Sociality.” in Public Affairs Quarterly, 33(1): 65-88. (2019). Read More
Articles
“Accountability and Community on the Internet: a Plea for Restorative Justice.” in The Journal of Applied Philosophy, 37(4): 594-611. (2020). Read More
Articles
“Introduction: The Push and Pull of Our Technological Moment.” The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, Issue 13. Co-authored (and Issue co-edited) with Michelle A. McSweeney. (2018). Read More
Articles
“Who Guards the Gates? Feminist Methods of Scholarly Publishing.” Forthcoming in Revealing Meaning: Feminist Methods in Digital Scholarship (Edited Volume). Wilfred Laurier Press. (Co-authored with Danica Savonick, SUNY Cortland; Amanda Licastro, Stevenson University). Read More