ACADEMICS

Thomas E. Conroy

Chair and Associate Professor of Urban Studies and Director, WSU CityLab

I am an urban historian specializing in urban exclusion historically and contemporarily. My scholarly work involves looking at marginal though often numerical superior populations who are often systematically excluded from power and/or at least the ability to achieve ethnic racial, economcial, gender justice through equity in American cities. I am also the director of CityLab, a reseach institute lodged in Urban Studies dedicated to community-engaged scholarship with interdisiplinary teams of university faculty and students.

Education

1998
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
History
MA
2004
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
History
Ph.D.
Skills American History Community Engaged Scholarship Immigrant/Immigration History Urban History

Achievements

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2016. Strategic Plan Implementation Fund Grant "CitySpeak: A New, Interdisciplinary Model to Address Urban Issues Through the Arts" In collaboration with Visual + Performing Arts Department. ($9,970)
Project Co-Creator and Principal Investigator In collaboration with Visual + Performing Arts Department.
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2017 Teaching & Learning Innovation Grant. "Personal and Professional Development in Urban Studies"
With co-lead author and co-awardee, Dr. Shiko Gathuo, this grant will involve all department faculty, staff, and students as well as outreach to both Urban Studies and Nonprofit Management alumni.
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Publications

  • Books
  • Papers
  • Articles
Books
In Search of Opportunity: Latino Men’s Paths to Post-Secondary Education in Urban Massachusetts (with Mary Jo Marion, Timothy E. Murphy, Ph.D., and Elizabeth Setren) Read More
Books
Worcester State University, A History of the University from its Founding to the Present. (Arcadia Publishing, May 2018). Read More
Papers
Suspension in Worcester: A Continuing Conversation (with Madeline Otis Campbell, Ph.D., Dannielle Morrow, and Jennifer Velez) Read More
Papers
Consortium Dreams: A Study of Worcester Students’ Hopes for Inter-College Connections (with Presidential Honors Seminar) Read More
Papers
A Study of Worcester’s Webster Square Node: suggesting areas for future economic and community development (with Joseph G. Schlegel) Read More
Papers
A Study of “Eligible” Voters in Worcester, Massachusetts (with William Hansen, Ph.D. and John Holbrook) Read More
Papers
Discipline, Opportunity, and Equity: WPS Public Data to Academic Year 2017-18, Executive Summary (with Alex Briesacher, Ph.D. and Kirby Wycoff, Psy. D.) Read More
Papers
State of Our Schools Legislative Breakfast Data Briefing (with Alex Briesacher, Ph.D., Timothy E. Murphy, Ph.D., and Kirby Wycoff, Psy. D., MPH) Read More
Papers
Affordable Housing in Worcester, Part 1: A Preliminary View of the American Community Survey and US Census Data (withJoshua Oliver and Mary Fowler, Ph.D.) Read More
Articles
Co-Author (with Sam O’Connell and Adam Zahler), “Cities as Studios: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Community-Engaged Theatre through the CitySpeak Project “in Anne Fliotsos & Gail S. Medford, New Directions in Teaching Theatre Arts, (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, Publishers, 2018) Read More

Service Projects

Preservation Worcester, Vice President of the Board

Preservation Worcester, Vice President of the Board

Courses

UR 1o1

Introduction to Urban Studies


Core course required of all Urban Studies Majors and Minors, Called by the department, "Intro." This is a survey course of Urban Studies. The term “Urban Studies” refers to a wide range of disciplines and approaches related to the study of cities, their suburbs and surrounding areas, urban concepts, and the process of urbanization. Thoroughly interdisciplinary, Urban Studies looks simultaneously at history, politics, economics, planning, architecture, ecology, geography, anthropology, sociology, engineering, psychology, and archeology (among others) insofar as all these things apply to urban locations.
3 cr. credits
UR 212

American Metropolitan Evolution


Core course required of all Urban Studies Majors and Minors. Called by the department, "Metro." American Metropolitan Evolution is an urban history course that surveys the development of American cities and their surrounding metropolitan areas. A core class for the Urban Studies major and minor, its purpose to explore how we arrived at our current urban political, economic, social, and cultural situation, and to lay out a historical context for the rest of your studies in the department. In addition to historical resources, students will also be exposed to select social sciences theories and writings from a variety of academic disciplines and perspectives, all of which help shed light on urban growth, decay, and renewal (and recovery from that renewal, which is where many cities are today). It is academically demanding in terms of both the scope of materials covered in just one semester (the whole span of American history), and the amount of work for a typical 200-level (sophomore) course because it is a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) class. Finally, this class will begin to expose you to some of the research strategies necessary for the department capstone, UR 401/Research Seminar.
3 cr. credits