Headshot of Daron Barnard
Daron Barnard
Professor
508-929-8143 dbarnard@worcester.edu
Faculty Office
ST310C
Office Hours:
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Areas of Expertise

Bio

I study the molecular mechanisms that control early development, using the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) as a model organism. I am particularly interested in understanding the molecular and genetic mechanisms used to silence mRNAs before they are needed, and then how the mRNAs are activated to allow translation to occur. The mechanisms involved are key to both maintaining immature eggs (oocytes) in an inactive state, and the subsequent activating event to become mature eggs, competent to be fertilized.

Education
1995
Middlebury College
Biology
BA
2000
Vanderbilt University
Molecular Biology
Ph.D.
2000-2004
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Molecular Medicine (Molecular Genetics of Development)
Postdoctoral Fellow
2004-2006
College of the Holy Cross
Biology/Bioinformatics
Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow
Service Projects
Senior Editor CBE--Life Sciences Education
CBE-Life Science Education is a peer-reviewed journal that publishes articles on student learning and pedagogical approaches in life sciences and related disciplines. The journal is free, online, and published quarterly. (http://www.lifescied.org)
Director, Aisiku STEM Center
The mission of the Center for STEM Research and Education is to enhance student learning and success in the STEM fields through facilitating interdisciplinary collaboration and initiatives. Representatives from STEM Departments at WSU (Biology, Chemistry Computer Science, Earth, Environment, and Physics, and Mathematics), work on initiatives to increase STEM retention and provide pathways for academic excellence. (https://www.worcester.edu/Aisiku-STEM-Center/)

Research At A Glance

Characterization of Xenopus Ifih1

Characterization of Xenopus Ifih1

Students working on Xenopus development have demonstrated that the mRNA for the ifih1 gene is found in the immature oocytes held in prophase of meiosis I (Stage VI oocytes). We are working to characterize the putative function of the Ifih1 protein in oocytes and in the resumption of meiosis (oocyte maturation).

Genomics

Genomics

I am interested in the organization, evolution and function of eukaryotic genomes. As part of the Genomics Education Partnership (GEP) we work with undergraduate students to annotate genomes, providing both a resource for the research community and the data needed for our comparative genomic investigation into the evolution and function of genomes. Currently, we are working on understanding the characteristics of the dot chromosome (F element) in Drosophila species.